Elicit vs IllicitPin

Elicit vs. Illicit: How to Get Illicit vs. Elicit Right?

What’s the difference between elicit vs. illicit?  When it comes to the English language, there are many words that sound similar but have different meanings. Two such words are elicit and illicit. While these words sound almost identical, they have very different definitions and uses.

In this article, we will explore the difference between elicit and illicit in more detail. We will discuss their definitions, provide examples of their usage, and explain how to use them correctly in different contexts.

Elicit vs. Illicit

When to Use Elicit

Elicit is a verb that means “to draw out or evoke a response or reaction.” It is often used in situations where someone is trying to get a particular response from another person. For example, a teacher might try to elicit a response from a student by asking a question.

Here are a few examples of how to use elicit in a sentence:

  • The comedian’s joke elicited laughter from the audience.
  • The coach’s motivational speech elicited a strong response from the team.
  • The survey was designed to elicit feedback from customers.

When to Use Illicit

Illicit, on the other hand, is an adjective that means “illegal or not permitted.” It is often used to describe actions or behaviors that are against the law or social norms. For example, selling drugs is an illicit activity.

Here are a few examples of how to use illicit in a sentence:

  • The police discovered an illicit drug operation in the basement of the building.
  • The company was fined for engaging in illicit business practices.
  • The student was expelled for engaging in illicit behavior on campus.

Both elicit and illicit are important terms to understand, as they can have significant implications in different contexts. For example, a police officer might elicit a confession from a suspect during an interrogation. However, if that confession was obtained through illicit means, such as coercion or torture, it would not be admissible in court.

It’s also worth noting that the opposite of illicit is licit, which means permissible. While illicit is a relatively common term, licit is not used as frequently.

Examples of Elicit vs. Illicit

When it comes to understanding the difference between elicit vs. illicit, examples can be helpful. Here are a few examples of each to help clarify their meanings.

Elicit Example Sentences

  • The teacher tried to elicit a response from the shy student by asking her a question.
  • The comedian’s jokes elicited a lot of laughter from the audience.
  • The survey was designed to elicit feedback from customers about their experience with the product.
  • The detective was able to elicit a confession from the suspect by using a clever interrogation technique.
  • The smell of freshly baked cookies in the kitchen elicited memories of childhood for many of us.

Illicit Example Sentences

  • The police raided the warehouse and found a large quantity of illicit drugs.
  • The company was fined for engaging in illicit business practices.
  • The website was shut down for selling illicit goods.
  • The teenager was caught with illicit materials in his backpack at school.
  • The politician was accused of accepting illicit payments from a foreign government.

Key Differences between Elicit vs. Illicit

The main difference between elicit vs. illicit is that elicit is a verb, while illicit is an adjective. Elicit means to draw out or evoke a response, while illicit means illegal or not permitted. Here are some additional differences between the two:

Elicit Illicit
Verb Adjective
To draw out or evoke a response Illegal or not permitted
To bring forth a reaction or response Not approved by custom
To obtain information or a confession Morally wrong

It’s important to note that elicit and illicit are homophones, which means they sound the same but have different meanings. It’s easy to confuse the two words, but paying attention to their definitions can help you use them correctly.

Another difference between the two words is their origins. Elicit comes from the Latin word “elicere,” which means “to draw out.” Illicit, on the other hand, comes from the Latin word “illicitus,” which means “not allowed.”

In conclusion, while elicit and illicit may sound similar, they have completely different meanings. Elicit is a verb that means to draw out or evoke a response, while illicit is an adjective that means illegal or not permitted. By understanding the key differences between these two words, you can ensure that you are using them correctly in your writing.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can “elicit” and “illicit” be used interchangeably?

No, they cannot be used interchangeably as they have completely different meanings.

Can you give an example of a sentence using “elicit”?

Sure.

  • “The comedian’s jokes elicited laughter from the audience.”

Can you give an example of a sentence using “illicit”?

Sure.

  • “The police arrested the man for selling illicit drugs.”

Is “elicit” a positive or negative word?

“Elicit” can be used in both positive and negative contexts. It depends on the situation and the response it elicits.

Is “illicit” always a negative word?

Yes, “illicit” is always a negative word as it refers to something that is illegal or not permitted by law.

Can “elicit” and “illicit” be used in the same sentence?

Yes, they can be used in the same sentence if the context calls for it. For example, “The undercover agent tried to elicit information about the illicit activities of the gang.”

When to Use Elicit vs. Illicit | Infographic

How to Use Elicit vs. Illicit?

Elicit vs. IllicitPin

Related links:

5 2 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

1 Comment
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Linda Okorie
Linda Okorie
4 years ago

This Is So Elightening. Thank U

1
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x